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fluid/14/♐ call me marty. or buddy. ze/zir/zim or they/them pronouns please

IM MKIGNGA THE WORST CRINGE FACE SOMEBODY FOUND ONE OF MY SHITTY SHERLOCK/HOMESTUCK CROSSOVER POSTS FROM 2011/2 OR SOMETHIGN THIS IS IT THIS IS HOW I DIE BYE WORLD

science-boner:

Dear tumblr: please stop making posts about how abusive parents on the internet are so funny and are you as a parent. I shouldn’t even have to say this. Why is this an issue.

spazzeon:

clefairydance:

every time someone says the word “spoopy” in pokémon episode 170 - A Better Pill to Swallow

SPOOPY

science-boner:

takeabreath-letherestcomeeasy:

poly-is-str8:

buzzfeedmusic:

This hilarious mom is selling her daughter’s one direction tickets on eBay to teach her a lesson.

Mother of the year.

OMG THIS IS MY FAVOURITE THING EVER

this is like.. really abusive tho.. like really emotionally n verbally abusive. why are you all so terrible

this is literally the most gross thing i have ever fucking seen i don’t want any of you gross shits near my fucking children you guys are fucking terrible

appendingfic:


ironcheflancaster:

wedonotpromoteviolence:

heirofspacecore:

sleek-black-wings:

thederpywingedone:

batmansymbol:

by the way did I ever tell y’all about the time I got a blank message from nobody, sent on new year’s eve in 1969, when the internet didn’t exist?
because that happened

What the fuck

Time travel.

Or maybe its from 2069, when we’ve developed the technology to send data to the past. You sent yourself a blank message as a test but as the email address you used to send it doesnt exist yet, it came up as no sender

I… what?

OKAY KIDS, LET’S LEARN ABOUT THE UNIX EPOCH
So back in the early days of computers, when we were trying to build clocks to keep all our computers in sync, we tried a bunch of different ways to synchronize them in ways that both normal people could use and programmers could utilize.
We just tried saying “The current time is THIS date” and just storing that date as some text, but while that was easy for humans, it was a bunch of different numbers that worked together in funny ways and computers don’t play nice with a bunch of random, arbitrary rules.
Not much worked, until we realized that we needed a BASELINE to compare against, and a way to represent the current time that covers everybody. So we came up with Unix time, because Unix was the style at the time. Essentially, Unix time represents any given time by saying “How many seconds ago was 12:00 AM on January 1, 1970 in Iceland somewhere?”. Recent enough to keep the numbers relatively small, far enough that nothing computer-y would fall before it, and consistent enough that there’d be no discrepancy based on where you are.
So what happens when you see the date “December 31, 1969” on a buggy message like this is that the computer received a bunch of zeroes by mistake and went “Oh, this must be a message!” Then when it tried to interpret it, it got to the date, found a zero, and said “Zero seconds since the Unix Epoch? I’ll round down - this was sent at the last second of New Year’s Eve, 1969! They’ll be so happy to finally get their blank message.”
And then the computer traipsed off on its merry way, because computers are fucking ridiculous.

This is frankly more hilarious than the 1969 time traveler theory

appendingfic:

ironcheflancaster:

wedonotpromoteviolence:

heirofspacecore:

sleek-black-wings:

thederpywingedone:

batmansymbol:

by the way did I ever tell y’all about the time I got a blank message from nobody, sent on new year’s eve in 1969, when the internet didn’t exist?

because that happened

What the fuck

Time travel.

Or maybe its from 2069, when we’ve developed the technology to send data to the past. You sent yourself a blank message as a test but as the email address you used to send it doesnt exist yet, it came up as no sender

I… what?

OKAY KIDS, LET’S LEARN ABOUT THE UNIX EPOCH

So back in the early days of computers, when we were trying to build clocks to keep all our computers in sync, we tried a bunch of different ways to synchronize them in ways that both normal people could use and programmers could utilize.

We just tried saying “The current time is THIS date” and just storing that date as some text, but while that was easy for humans, it was a bunch of different numbers that worked together in funny ways and computers don’t play nice with a bunch of random, arbitrary rules.

Not much worked, until we realized that we needed a BASELINE to compare against, and a way to represent the current time that covers everybody. So we came up with Unix time, because Unix was the style at the time. Essentially, Unix time represents any given time by saying “How many seconds ago was 12:00 AM on January 1, 1970 in Iceland somewhere?”. Recent enough to keep the numbers relatively small, far enough that nothing computer-y would fall before it, and consistent enough that there’d be no discrepancy based on where you are.

So what happens when you see the date “December 31, 1969” on a buggy message like this is that the computer received a bunch of zeroes by mistake and went “Oh, this must be a message!” Then when it tried to interpret it, it got to the date, found a zero, and said “Zero seconds since the Unix Epoch? I’ll round down - this was sent at the last second of New Year’s Eve, 1969! They’ll be so happy to finally get their blank message.”

And then the computer traipsed off on its merry way, because computers are fucking ridiculous.

This is frankly more hilarious than the 1969 time traveler theory

nextyearsgirl:

"Agree to disagree" is white guy speak for "I understand you have an opinion but unfortunately, me."

neptunain:

remember when children used to say “i know you are but what am i” bc never in my adult life have i found an incident where that phrase is more appropriate

cancerously:

jaimeuncledaddylannister:

here we are kids
it’s finally over

Okay but this is legitimately a HUGE thing for people that have been in fandom for more than 10 years or so. People usually talk primarily about Livejournal being a huge fandom hub, but most Livejournal users were teenagers or above, because of the age cap for registering (which is 13). Even though fanfiction.net also existed at this time, it’s registration cap was 18- and even though it had ~100k users come 2002 when Quizilla opened, the age cap was restrictive and good enough to scare away pre-teens and people usually at the beginning of their fandom experience.
Enter Quizilla. Quizilla was used incredibly frequently as a platform for choose-your-own-adventure stores, self-indulgent “would would you marry from x series?” stories and became a huge hub for younger fans and series directed towards children. Lots of early-2000’s cartoons had their big hubs on Quizilla, and a lot of anime that was just starting to be played on network television (shows primarily from Cartoon Network’s Toonami block) was growing in a younger fanbase. Not to mention the fact that because the site had no age limit and was a small community, there was still hidden r-rated fanfiction hidden between quizzes. It was the product of the beginning of a lot of young kid’s sexual exploration, as well.
I had my first real fandom experience on Quizilla- I was on the site incredibly early and was only 9 years old at the time. It’s really nostalgic for me, personally, because it was the first time I participated in an anime community. Was it really dumb? Hell yes, I was 9. I jumped ship from the site about 4 years later when it was sold to Nickelodeon and most fandom moved away from the site.
Quizilla was really important, guys. It’s easily the same tier as young fandom growth as Neopets was. This is a really sad day that it’s finally fading off into the depths of the internet.

cancerously:

jaimeuncledaddylannister:

here we are kids

it’s finally over

Okay but this is legitimately a HUGE thing for people that have been in fandom for more than 10 years or so. People usually talk primarily about Livejournal being a huge fandom hub, but most Livejournal users were teenagers or above, because of the age cap for registering (which is 13). Even though fanfiction.net also existed at this time, it’s registration cap was 18- and even though it had ~100k users come 2002 when Quizilla opened, the age cap was restrictive and good enough to scare away pre-teens and people usually at the beginning of their fandom experience.

Enter Quizilla. Quizilla was used incredibly frequently as a platform for choose-your-own-adventure stores, self-indulgent “would would you marry from x series?” stories and became a huge hub for younger fans and series directed towards children. Lots of early-2000’s cartoons had their big hubs on Quizilla, and a lot of anime that was just starting to be played on network television (shows primarily from Cartoon Network’s Toonami block) was growing in a younger fanbase. Not to mention the fact that because the site had no age limit and was a small community, there was still hidden r-rated fanfiction hidden between quizzes. It was the product of the beginning of a lot of young kid’s sexual exploration, as well.

I had my first real fandom experience on Quizilla- I was on the site incredibly early and was only 9 years old at the time. It’s really nostalgic for me, personally, because it was the first time I participated in an anime community. Was it really dumb? Hell yes, I was 9. I jumped ship from the site about 4 years later when it was sold to Nickelodeon and most fandom moved away from the site.

Quizilla was really important, guys. It’s easily the same tier as young fandom growth as Neopets was. This is a really sad day that it’s finally fading off into the depths of the internet.